Reference Library: All References

Reduced pH sea water disrupts chemo-responsive behaviour in an intertidal crustacean

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification conditions interfered with the chemoreception, or "smelling", that hermit crabs use to find shells and prey. The hermit crabs moved less, had lower flicking rates of their antennae (a ‘sniffing’ behavior in decapods), and were less successful in locating the odor source. (Laboratory study)

Reduced sea water pH disrupts resource assessment and decision making in the hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Hermit crabs living in highly acidified seawater (pH 6.8) were less likely to leave a suboptimal shell in favor of an optimal shell. Those that did change shells took longer to do so. Crabs in acidified water also moved less and had lower flicking rates of their antennae (a ‘sniffing’ ...

Effects of pCO2 on physiology and skeletal mineralogy in a tidal pool coralline alga Corallina elongata

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

A coralline red alga that lives in tide pools, where it is common for CO2 levels to fluctuate tremendously daily and seasonally, was relatively robust to ocean acidification conditions, compared to other types of coralline algae. (Laboratory study)

The effect of CO2 acidified sea water and reduced salinity on aspects of the embryonic development of the amphipod Echinogammarus marinus (Leach)

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

While ocean acidification may have some negative effects on the eggs of amphipods, exposure to low-salinity water is likely to affect the eggs more, based on ocean acidification trends projected for the next 300 years. (Laboratory study)

Impacts of ocean acidification on respiratory gas exchange and acid–base balance in a marine teleost, Opsanus beta.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

In the gulf toadfish, respiratory gas transport and acid–base balance are affected by ocean acidification. While the full physiological impacts are not known, the changes could compromise several physiological systems. (Laboratory study)

Losers and winners in coral reefs acclimatized to elevated carbon dioxide concentrations

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

This field study in Papua New Guinea examined the effects of natural carbon dioxide seeps on coral reef ecosystems. At reduced pH, coral diversity was lower, population replenishment and abundance of some corals decreased, and interactions among species changed. Reef development ceased below pH 7.7. Ocean acidification, together with warmer ...

Contrasting resource limitations of marine primary producers: Implications for competitive interactions under enriched CO2 and nutrient regimes

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification may favor growth of algal turfs rather than kelp forests. Such a change would affect the many species associated with algal turf or kelp forest habitats.

Future high CO2 in the intertidal may compromise adult barnacle Semibalanus balanoides survival and embryonic development rate.

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

In ocean acidification conditions (pH 7.7) embryos of an intertidal barnacle developed more slowly. Survival of adult barnacles dropped by 22 percent, and the mineral structure of adult shells changed. (Laboratory study)

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