Reference Library: All References

The swimming kinematics of larval Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., are resilient to elevated seawater pCO2

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:29
  • By: petert

Kinematics of swimming behavior of larval Atlantic cod, aged 12 and 27 days post-hatch (dph) and cultured under three pCO2 conditions (control-370, medium-1800, and high-4200 μatm) from March to May 2010, were extracted from swim path recordings obtained using silhouette video photography. The swim paths were analyzed for swim duration, distance and speed, ...

Changes in the timing of high river flows in New England over the 20th Century

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:27
  • By: petert

The annual timing of river flows is a good indicator of climate-related changes, or lack of changes, for rivers with long-term data that drain unregulated basins with stable land use. Changes in the timing of annual winter/spring (January 1 to May 31) and fall (October 1 to December 31) center ...

Carbonate Mineral Saturation State as the Recruitment Cue for Settling Bivalves in Marine Muds

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:25
  • By: petert

After a pelagic larval phase, infaunal bivalves undergo metamorphosis and transition to the underlying sediments to begin the benthic stage of their life history, where they explore and then either accept or reject sediments. Although the settlement cues used by juvenile infaunal bivalves are poorly understood, here we provide evidence ...

Egg and early larval stages of Baltic cod, Gadus morhua, are robust to high levels of ocean acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:23
  • By: petert

The accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will lower the pH in ocean waters, a process termed ocean acidification (OA). Despite its potentially detrimental effects on calcifying organisms, experimental studies on the possible impacts on fish remain scarce. While adults will most likely remain relatively unaffected by changes in ...

Severe tissue damage in Atlantic cod larvae under increasing ocean acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:21
  • By: petert

Ocean acidification, caused by increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2, is one of the most critical anthropogenicthreats to marine life. Changes in seawater carbonate chemistry have the potential to disturb calcification, acid–base regulation, blood circulation and respiration, as well as the nervous system of marine organisms, leading to long-term effects such ...

Detecting regional anthropogenic trends in ocean acidification against natural variability

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:18
  • By: petert

Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution humans have released ~500 billion metric tons of carbon to the atmosphere through fossil-fuel burning, cement production and land-use changes. About 30% has been taken up by the oceans. The oceanic uptake of carbon dioxide leads to changes in marine carbonate chemistry resulting in a ...

Vulnerability and adaptation of US shellfisheries to ocean acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:16
  • By: petert

Ocean acidification is a global, long-term problem whose ultimate solution requires carbon dioxide reduction at a scope and scale that will take decades to accomplish successfully. Until that is achieved, feasible and locally relevant adaptation and mitigation measures are needed. To help to prioritize societal responses to ocean acidification, we ...

Long-term and trans-life-cycle impacts of exposure to ocean acidification in the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:13
  • By: petert

Anthropogenic CO2 emissions are acidifying the world’s oceans. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that ocean acidification can impact survival, growth, development and physiology of marine invertebrates. Here, we tested the impact of long-term (up to 16 months) and trans-life-cycle (adult, embryo/larvae and juvenile) exposure to elevated pCO2 (1,200 μatm, compared to control 400 μatm) on ...

Recent changes in the North Atlantic

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 15:11
  • By: petert

It has long been recognized that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is potentially sensitive to greenhouse–gas and other climate forcing, and that changes in the MOC have the potential to cause abrupt climate change. However, the mechanisms remain poorly understood and our ability to detect these changes remains incomplete. ...

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