Understanding ocean acidification impacts on organismal to ecological scales

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Ocean acidification (OA) research seeks to understand how marine ecosystems and global elemental cycles will respond to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry in combination with other environmental perturbations such as warming, eutrophication, and deoxygenation. This paper discusses the effectiveness and limitations of current research approaches used to address this goal. ...

Reduced calcification of marine plankton in response to increased atmospheric CO2

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Two dominant marine calcifying phytoplankton species, the coccolithophorids Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, produced less calcite under ocean acidification conditions. They also had more deformities and higher rates of incomplete development. The findings suggest that ocean acidification could slow down the production of calcium carbonate in the ocean. (Laboratory study) ...

Skeletal mineralogy in a high-CO2 world

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

This study investigated changes in mineralization in 18 species of marine calcifiers, which were reared for 60 days in different levels of ocean acidification conditions. The results suggest that shell/skeletal mineralogy within some—but not all—marine calcifiers will change as carbon dioxide levels continue rising as a result of fossil fuel ...

The growing human footprint on coastal and open-ocean biogeochemistry

  • Posted on: Mon, 06/13/2016 - 05:56
  • By: Anonymous

Climate change, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide, excess nutrient inputs, and pollution in its many forms are fundamentally altering the chemistry of the ocean, often on a global scale and, in some cases, at rates greatly exceeding those in the historical and recent geological record. Major observed trends include a shift ...

History of Seawater Carbonate Chemistry, Atmospheric CO2, and Ocean Acidification

  • Posted on: Wed, 03/30/2016 - 16:00
  • By: petert

Humans are continuing to add vast amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere through fossil fuel burning and other activities. A large fraction of the CO2 is taken up by the oceans in a process that lowers ocean pH and carbonate mineral saturation state. This effect has potentially serious consequences ...

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